VinceKG

The daily musings of things that make my heart skip

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emergentfutures:

Can Crowdsourcing Tell Us Whether A Burrito Is Any Good?

This past summer, FiveThirtyEight took on the somewhat ridiculous task of searching for America’s Best Burrito.


Full Story: fivethirtyeight

emergentfutures:

Can Crowdsourcing Tell Us Whether A Burrito Is Any Good?

This past summer, FiveThirtyEight took on the somewhat ridiculous task of searching for America’s Best Burrito.

Full Story: fivethirtyeight

archiemcphee:

Today the Archie McPhee Library explores a particularly fascinating part of the English language, collective nouns, words that denote a group of things (a “school of fish”, for example). An Exaltation of Larks [Buy on Amazon] by James Lipton (yes, the same James Lipton of Inside the Actors Studio) is an entertaining and exhaustive assemblage of collective nouns, over 1,100 over them, beautifully illustrated with hundreds of engravings created by 19th century French illustrator J.J. Grandville.

An “exaltation of larks”? Yes! And a “leap of leopards,” a “parliament of owls,” an “ostentation of peacocks,” a “smack of jellyfish,” and a “murder of crows”! For those who have ever wondered if the familiar “pride of lions” and “gaggle of geese” were only the tip of a linguistic iceberg, James Lipton has provided the definitive answer: here are hundreds of equally pithy, and often poetic, terms unearthed by Mr. Lipton in the Books of Venery that were the constant study of anyone who aspired to the title of gentleman in the fifteenth century. When Mr. Lipton’s painstaking research revealed that five hundred years ago the terms of venery had already been turned into the Game of Venery, he embarked on an odyssey that has given us a “slouch of models,” a “shrivel of critics,” an “unction of undertakers,” a “blur of Impressionists,” a “score of bachelors,” and a “pocket of quarterbacks.”

Here’s what Lipton himself had to say about what inspired him to write this awesome book:

"I cornered the market on the most peculiar habit of the English language, namely the designation of groups of things by a term. We all know a few, a gaggle of geese, a pride of lions, a host of angels, and we use them without thinking about them. A chorus of complaint. One day I suddenly thought to myself, why a gaggle of geese, why a pride of lions? A pride of lions – pride, really, it is the quintessence of a lion; he’s proud. Who said that we will capture the entire quintessence of this beast in a single word, a pride of lions? And that started me on a search that lasted for years."

Click here for the complete interview.

We use collective nouns all the time, sometimes without even thinking about them (think “flight of stairs”), but this book reveals that there are far more of them in existence than we ever dreamt. It’s one of the most amusing reference books we’ve ever encountered and, ultimately, it’s also a wonderful love letter to the English language. Which is why, in turn, this book is a must-have for anyone in love with words.

archiemcphee:

This awesome Interactive Origami Sculpture was created by Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima, who’d been challenged to create something inspired by the fascinating Ghostcube system made by Swedish designer Erik Åberg. Nothing but paper and glue make up this interlocking system of 40 paper cubes.

If you’re feeling dexterous, Nakashima created a 45-step Instructables tutorial to help you make your very own kinetic origami sculpture.

He also runs an extraordinarily popular YouTube channel devoted to instructional origami videos, which is well worth a visit.

[via Colossal]

futurejournalismproject:

In Praise of the Humble Comma
The gods, they say, give breath, and they take it away. But the same could be said — could it not? — of the humble comma. Add it to the present clause, and, of a sudden, the mind is, quite literally, given pause to think; take it out if you wish or forget it and the mind is deprived of a resting place. Yet still the comma gets no respect. It seems just a slip of a thing, a pedant’s tick, a blip on the edge of our consciousness, a kind of printer’s smudge almost. Small, we claim, is beautiful (especially in the age of the microchip). Yet what is so often used, and so rarely recalled, as the comma — unless it be breath itself?
Punctuation, one is taught, has a point: to keep up law and order. Punctuation marks are the road signs placed along the highway of our communication — to control speeds, provide directions and prevent head-on collisions. A period has the unblinking finality of a red light; the comma is a flashing yellow light that asks us only to slow down; and the semicolon is a stop sign that tells us to ease gradually to a halt, before gradually starting up again. — Pico Iyer, 2001. Via Time.

futurejournalismproject:

In Praise of the Humble Comma

The gods, they say, give breath, and they take it away. But the same could be said — could it not? — of the humble comma. Add it to the present clause, and, of a sudden, the mind is, quite literally, given pause to think; take it out if you wish or forget it and the mind is deprived of a resting place. Yet still the comma gets no respect. It seems just a slip of a thing, a pedant’s tick, a blip on the edge of our consciousness, a kind of printer’s smudge almost. Small, we claim, is beautiful (especially in the age of the microchip). Yet what is so often used, and so rarely recalled, as the comma — unless it be breath itself?

Punctuation, one is taught, has a point: to keep up law and order. Punctuation marks are the road signs placed along the highway of our communication — to control speeds, provide directions and prevent head-on collisions. A period has the unblinking finality of a red light; the comma is a flashing yellow light that asks us only to slow down; and the semicolon is a stop sign that tells us to ease gradually to a halt, before gradually starting up again. — Pico Iyer, 2001. Via Time.

pbsparents:

This baby was born to ROCK!
(via reddit)

pbsparents:

This baby was born to ROCK!

(via reddit)

"“I believe we’re in the midst of a privatization phase,” says Systrom. This shift can be seen in the rise of apps like Snapchat and Whatsapp, which let users manipulate and share images with smaller audiences. “It’s not a technological shift, but a sociological shift, and we’re responding to it,” he says."

"Design is creativity with strategy."

Rob Curedale
Product Designer (via thehipperelement)
diy:

How To Teach Math With LEGOs
by Katie Lepi of Edudemic
Using Legos in the classroom is not a new concept at all. There are so many different classroom applications for the popular brightly colored bricks, and despite the myriad of uses, the go-to task for Legos is most often math. The handy little nubs sitting atop the bricks offer a chance to teach things like area and perimeter, the different colors lend themselves well to fractions. 
The handy infographic below takes a look at different ways to use fractions to teach math. The visual aspect is pretty handy – you can clearly see how your students will be able to group and divide the blocks to grasp the concepts in a fun way. Do you have other math-specific ways you’ve employed Legos in the classroom?  Share your awesome ideas with the Edudemic community by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.
Using Legos To Teach Math
Fractions: Using bricks of the same size but different color, have the students count out the denominator (total bricks) and the numerator representative of each color. You can employ any size bricks for this task.
Area and Perimeter: Using bricks of any color, construct a rectangle or square. The students can use the nubs on top of the bricks to calculate the area and the perimeter of each shape they create.
Multiplication: Using bricks of various sizes (ie 4 nubs on top, 8 nubs on top), students can calculate how many total nubs there are based on the number of same-sized bricks. Thus, a group of 4 ‘size 4′ bricks would yield 16 nubs)
Mean, Median, Mode, and Range: Using groups of different sized bricks (ie, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1) and totaling the nubs on each group, students can calculate the mean, median, mode, and range.
Place Value: Using a bullseye visual or other type of visual (like this one), place different ‘sized’ bricks in each category, and the students can use that information to write out the number indicated. This could make for fun group work in class.

diy:

How To Teach Math With LEGOs

by Katie Lepi of Edudemic

Using Legos in the classroom is not a new concept at all. There are so many different classroom applications for the popular brightly colored bricks, and despite the myriad of uses, the go-to task for Legos is most often math. The handy little nubs sitting atop the bricks offer a chance to teach things like area and perimeter, the different colors lend themselves well to fractions. 

The handy infographic below takes a look at different ways to use fractions to teach math. The visual aspect is pretty handy – you can clearly see how your students will be able to group and divide the blocks to grasp the concepts in a fun way. Do you have other math-specific ways you’ve employed Legos in the classroom?  Share your awesome ideas with the Edudemic community by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.

Using Legos To Teach Math

  • Fractions: Using bricks of the same size but different color, have the students count out the denominator (total bricks) and the numerator representative of each color. You can employ any size bricks for this task.
  • Area and Perimeter: Using bricks of any color, construct a rectangle or square. The students can use the nubs on top of the bricks to calculate the area and the perimeter of each shape they create.
  • Multiplication: Using bricks of various sizes (ie 4 nubs on top, 8 nubs on top), students can calculate how many total nubs there are based on the number of same-sized bricks. Thus, a group of 4 ‘size 4′ bricks would yield 16 nubs)
  • Mean, Median, Mode, and Range: Using groups of different sized bricks (ie, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1) and totaling the nubs on each group, students can calculate the mean, median, mode, and range.
  • Place Value: Using a bullseye visual or other type of visual (like this one), place different ‘sized’ bricks in each category, and the students can use that information to write out the number indicated. This could make for fun group work in class.

archiemcphee:

Twin Brazilian street artists Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, collectively known as Os Gêmeos (previously featured here), just completed this awesomely huge, vibrant and detailed piece covering six towering silos on Granville island in Vancouver, Canada for the Vancouver Biennale. These massive Giants are the brothers’ largest work to date.They spent three months painting the 75-foot-tall industrial towers in their distinctive colorful style, full of smaller hidden characters. A successful Indiegogo fundraising campaign helped the brothers cover the expenses needed to complete this non-profit public art project.

The twins spent the final days adding numerous details to their characters – pockets, stitches, buttons, shoes, fabric patterns, all by using lots of bright colors and by painting more and more signature yellow faces. Using the architecture of the silos, the giants are all kneeling with four of them facing one way, and the other two facing the other way, giving the finished work a full 360 degree identity.

Visit StreetArtNews and Arrested Motion for additional images of this amazing installation.

diy:

Challenge of the Day: Sketch Wireframes
Wireframes are how web designers try layout ideas before investing a lot of time in a detailed design. Sketch a wireframe for a site and use the button kit you’ve made to create a visual guide/prototype of a website. This project solves a challenge for the Web Designer Skill.

diy:

Challenge of the Day: Sketch Wireframes

Wireframes are how web designers try layout ideas before investing a lot of time in a detailed design. Sketch a wireframe for a site and use the button kit you’ve made to create a visual guide/prototype of a website. This project solves a challenge for the Web Designer Skill.

kadist:

The Guggenheim has an excellent playlist on Soundcloud with interviews with artists for Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today. Above, you can hear an interview with Carlos Amorales. Other interviewees include Amalia Pica, Luis Camnitzer, Wilfredo Prieto, and more.

To listen to the whole playlist, click here.

In this excerpt from his commentary for the Under the Same Sun multimedia guide, artist Carlos Amorales talks about his participatory installation in the exhibition, which elicits musical responses ranging from the subtle to the bombastic. He also describes making the work in the former studio of sculptor Alexander Calder.
http://www.guggenheim.org/guggenheim-foundation/collaborations/map/latinamerica/artist/carlos-amorales