VinceKG

The daily musings of things that make my heart skip

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"“I believe we’re in the midst of a privatization phase,” says Systrom. This shift can be seen in the rise of apps like Snapchat and Whatsapp, which let users manipulate and share images with smaller audiences. “It’s not a technological shift, but a sociological shift, and we’re responding to it,” he says."

"Design is creativity with strategy."

Rob Curedale
Product Designer (via thehipperelement)
diy:

How To Teach Math With LEGOs
by Katie Lepi of Edudemic
Using Legos in the classroom is not a new concept at all. There are so many different classroom applications for the popular brightly colored bricks, and despite the myriad of uses, the go-to task for Legos is most often math. The handy little nubs sitting atop the bricks offer a chance to teach things like area and perimeter, the different colors lend themselves well to fractions. 
The handy infographic below takes a look at different ways to use fractions to teach math. The visual aspect is pretty handy – you can clearly see how your students will be able to group and divide the blocks to grasp the concepts in a fun way. Do you have other math-specific ways you’ve employed Legos in the classroom?  Share your awesome ideas with the Edudemic community by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.
Using Legos To Teach Math
Fractions: Using bricks of the same size but different color, have the students count out the denominator (total bricks) and the numerator representative of each color. You can employ any size bricks for this task.
Area and Perimeter: Using bricks of any color, construct a rectangle or square. The students can use the nubs on top of the bricks to calculate the area and the perimeter of each shape they create.
Multiplication: Using bricks of various sizes (ie 4 nubs on top, 8 nubs on top), students can calculate how many total nubs there are based on the number of same-sized bricks. Thus, a group of 4 ‘size 4′ bricks would yield 16 nubs)
Mean, Median, Mode, and Range: Using groups of different sized bricks (ie, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1) and totaling the nubs on each group, students can calculate the mean, median, mode, and range.
Place Value: Using a bullseye visual or other type of visual (like this one), place different ‘sized’ bricks in each category, and the students can use that information to write out the number indicated. This could make for fun group work in class.

diy:

How To Teach Math With LEGOs

by Katie Lepi of Edudemic

Using Legos in the classroom is not a new concept at all. There are so many different classroom applications for the popular brightly colored bricks, and despite the myriad of uses, the go-to task for Legos is most often math. The handy little nubs sitting atop the bricks offer a chance to teach things like area and perimeter, the different colors lend themselves well to fractions. 

The handy infographic below takes a look at different ways to use fractions to teach math. The visual aspect is pretty handy – you can clearly see how your students will be able to group and divide the blocks to grasp the concepts in a fun way. Do you have other math-specific ways you’ve employed Legos in the classroom?  Share your awesome ideas with the Edudemic community by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.

Using Legos To Teach Math

  • Fractions: Using bricks of the same size but different color, have the students count out the denominator (total bricks) and the numerator representative of each color. You can employ any size bricks for this task.
  • Area and Perimeter: Using bricks of any color, construct a rectangle or square. The students can use the nubs on top of the bricks to calculate the area and the perimeter of each shape they create.
  • Multiplication: Using bricks of various sizes (ie 4 nubs on top, 8 nubs on top), students can calculate how many total nubs there are based on the number of same-sized bricks. Thus, a group of 4 ‘size 4′ bricks would yield 16 nubs)
  • Mean, Median, Mode, and Range: Using groups of different sized bricks (ie, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1) and totaling the nubs on each group, students can calculate the mean, median, mode, and range.
  • Place Value: Using a bullseye visual or other type of visual (like this one), place different ‘sized’ bricks in each category, and the students can use that information to write out the number indicated. This could make for fun group work in class.

archiemcphee:

Twin Brazilian street artists Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, collectively known as Os Gêmeos (previously featured here), just completed this awesomely huge, vibrant and detailed piece covering six towering silos on Granville island in Vancouver, Canada for the Vancouver Biennale. These massive Giants are the brothers’ largest work to date.They spent three months painting the 75-foot-tall industrial towers in their distinctive colorful style, full of smaller hidden characters. A successful Indiegogo fundraising campaign helped the brothers cover the expenses needed to complete this non-profit public art project.

The twins spent the final days adding numerous details to their characters – pockets, stitches, buttons, shoes, fabric patterns, all by using lots of bright colors and by painting more and more signature yellow faces. Using the architecture of the silos, the giants are all kneeling with four of them facing one way, and the other two facing the other way, giving the finished work a full 360 degree identity.

Visit StreetArtNews and Arrested Motion for additional images of this amazing installation.

diy:

Challenge of the Day: Sketch Wireframes
Wireframes are how web designers try layout ideas before investing a lot of time in a detailed design. Sketch a wireframe for a site and use the button kit you’ve made to create a visual guide/prototype of a website. This project solves a challenge for the Web Designer Skill.

diy:

Challenge of the Day: Sketch Wireframes

Wireframes are how web designers try layout ideas before investing a lot of time in a detailed design. Sketch a wireframe for a site and use the button kit you’ve made to create a visual guide/prototype of a website. This project solves a challenge for the Web Designer Skill.

kadist:

The Guggenheim has an excellent playlist on Soundcloud with interviews with artists for Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today. Above, you can hear an interview with Carlos Amorales. Other interviewees include Amalia Pica, Luis Camnitzer, Wilfredo Prieto, and more.

To listen to the whole playlist, click here.

In this excerpt from his commentary for the Under the Same Sun multimedia guide, artist Carlos Amorales talks about his participatory installation in the exhibition, which elicits musical responses ranging from the subtle to the bombastic. He also describes making the work in the former studio of sculptor Alexander Calder.
http://www.guggenheim.org/guggenheim-foundation/collaborations/map/latinamerica/artist/carlos-amorales

explore-blog:

David Foster Wallace on writing and how we find ourselves.
Those rare resonant writers, for me, include Rebecca Solnit, Anne Lamott, Dani Shapiro, and E.B. White.

explore-blog:

David Foster Wallace on writing and how we find ourselves.

Those rare resonant writers, for me, include Rebecca Solnit, Anne LamottDani Shapiro, and E.B. White.

theweekmagazine:

The surprising journey of a Panama hat, from field to head

A New York photographer traces the creation of an iconic topper

"General Electric plans to announce Monday that it has created a “data lake” method of analyzing sensor information from industrial machinery in places like railroads, airlines, hospitals and utilities. G.E. has been putting sensors on everything it can for a couple of years, and now it is out to read all that information quickly. The company, working with an outfit called Pivotal, said that in the last three months it has looked at information from 3.4 million miles of flights by 24 airlines using G.E. jet engines. G.E. said it figured out things like possible defects 2,000 times as fast as it could before. The company has to, since it’s getting so much more data. “In 10 years, 17 billion pieces of equipment will have sensors,” said William Ruh, vice president of G.E. software. “We’re only one-tenth of the way there.”"

historicaltimes:

First selfie in space: Buzz Aldrin, Gemini 12, 1966.

historicaltimes:

First selfie in space: Buzz Aldrin, Gemini 12, 1966.

(via ktothestein)

joshsundquist:

I’m pretty sure the majority of my waking hours are now spent entering passwords into my phone and computer.

(via ilovecharts)

Blank canvas

Blank canvas

mapsontheweb:

Simplified Map of all Interstates and U.S. Highways
Read More

mapsontheweb:

Simplified Map of all Interstates and U.S. Highways

Read More

(Source: flickr.com, via ktothestein)