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theatlantic:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Last week, Africa Is a Country, a blog that documents and skewers Western misconceptions of Africa, ran a fascinating story about book design. It posted a collage of 36 covers of books that were either set in Africa or written by African writers. The texts of the books were as diverse as the geography they covered: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique. They were written in wildly divergent styles, by writers that included several Nobel Prize winners. Yet all of books’ covers featured an acacia tree, an orange sunset over the veld, or both.
"In short," the post said, "the covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Last week, Africa Is a Country, a blog that documents and skewers Western misconceptions of Africa, ran a fascinating story about book design. It posted a collage of 36 covers of books that were either set in Africa or written by African writers. The texts of the books were as diverse as the geography they covered: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique. They were written in wildly divergent styles, by writers that included several Nobel Prize winners. Yet all of books’ covers featured an acacia tree, an orange sunset over the veld, or both.

"In short," the post said, "the covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

brit:

Google Street View FTW. Read more.

brit:

Google Street View FTW. Read more.

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.
How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.
Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.
"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.
Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.

How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.

Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.

"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.

Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

theweekmagazine:

How to cook like a Game of Thrones character

It’s time to feast like winter is coming

archiemcphee:

For a public installation entitled Magic Carpets 2014, French artist Miguel Chevalier transformed the floor of the Sacré Coeur cathedral in Casablanca, Morocco into an interactive psychedelic light show choreographed to music by Michel Redolfi.

Visitors walk across a massive carpet of light that first appears as an unstable monochromatic display before giving way to vivid blocks and whorls of color. The trajectory of the kaleidoscopic shapes and colors changes in response to visitors’ footsteps.

Click here for video of the installation in action.

[via designboom]

What people want in the year 3030 according to Momofuku’s David Chang

(Source: Spotify)

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders follows photographer Michael Nichols to the Sequoia National Park in California where he and his team captured an awe-inspiring photo of the The President, a giant sequoia tree believed to be over 3,200 years old. Standing 247 feet (75 m) tall and measuring 27 ft (8.2 m) in diameter at the base, The President is the third largest tree in the world.

Stop and consider this for a moment - how periods of human existence an world events have taken place while this tree has simply been growing and growing. And it’s still growing!

"The tree is one of the fastest growing trees ever measured, accumulating more new wood each year than much younger trees, proving that ancient trees still have plenty of life and energy left."

For the December 2012 issue of National Geographic, Nichols and team spent 32 days using a rigging system to take 126 photos which were later stitched together to create a complete portrait of the tree. By including members of their team in some of the shots, they helped convey just how huge and majestic The President is.

Visit My Modern Metropolis for additional photos of this truly awesome tree.

Meet Divvy

wbezdata:

Divvy announces winners of its first Data Challenge:

(via lifeandcode)

devilduck:

Deep underground, federal employees process paperwork by hand and store millions of manila folders.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2014/03/22/sinkhole-of-bureaucracy/

devilduck:

Deep underground, federal employees process paperwork by hand and store millions of manila folders.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2014/03/22/sinkhole-of-bureaucracy/

"In 1984, 37% of CS degrees went to women. In 1998, it was 34%. In 2010-11, it was 12%."

mothernaturenetwork:

Coconut oil benefitsLearn more about how this fatty ingredient can be beneficial to your health.

mothernaturenetwork:

Coconut oil benefits
Learn more about how this fatty ingredient can be beneficial to your health.

prostheticknowledge:

Your Name In Life

Online math toy by Clark DuVall converts your name or text as the base to run the rules of Conway’s Game of Life:

The Game of Life was invented by John Horton Conway in 1970. It is a cellular automation, which consists of a group of cells in a grid. The cells switch between states based on a set of rules.

Your Name in Life allows you to create a unique Game of Life based on your name.

Try it out for yourself here

[Hat Tip - roomthily]