VinceKG

The daily musings of things that make my heart skip

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explore-blog:

David Foster Wallace on writing and how we find ourselves.
Those rare resonant writers, for me, include Rebecca Solnit, Anne Lamott, Dani Shapiro, and E.B. White.

explore-blog:

David Foster Wallace on writing and how we find ourselves.

Those rare resonant writers, for me, include Rebecca Solnit, Anne LamottDani Shapiro, and E.B. White.

theweekmagazine:

The surprising journey of a Panama hat, from field to head

A New York photographer traces the creation of an iconic topper

"General Electric plans to announce Monday that it has created a “data lake” method of analyzing sensor information from industrial machinery in places like railroads, airlines, hospitals and utilities. G.E. has been putting sensors on everything it can for a couple of years, and now it is out to read all that information quickly. The company, working with an outfit called Pivotal, said that in the last three months it has looked at information from 3.4 million miles of flights by 24 airlines using G.E. jet engines. G.E. said it figured out things like possible defects 2,000 times as fast as it could before. The company has to, since it’s getting so much more data. “In 10 years, 17 billion pieces of equipment will have sensors,” said William Ruh, vice president of G.E. software. “We’re only one-tenth of the way there.”"

historicaltimes:

First selfie in space: Buzz Aldrin, Gemini 12, 1966.

historicaltimes:

First selfie in space: Buzz Aldrin, Gemini 12, 1966.

(via ktothestein)

joshsundquist:

I’m pretty sure the majority of my waking hours are now spent entering passwords into my phone and computer.

(via ilovecharts)

Blank canvas

Blank canvas

mapsontheweb:

Simplified Map of all Interstates and U.S. Highways
Read More

mapsontheweb:

Simplified Map of all Interstates and U.S. Highways

Read More

(Source: flickr.com, via ktothestein)

Birthday on the beach

Birthday on the beach

ktothestein:

space-pics:

Alan Shepard’s Freedom 7 spacesuit, 52 years ago todayhttp://space-pics.tumblr.com/

I’d like to wear this to a party..   if I ever went to a party..

ktothestein:

space-pics:

Alan Shepard’s Freedom 7 spacesuit, 52 years ago today
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

I’d like to wear this to a party..   if I ever went to a party..

explore-blog:

The late and great Pete Seeger on creativity, originality, and why ideas come to us when we stop trying to force them, in a fantastic 1988 interview.

explore-blog:

The late and great Pete Seeger on creativity, originality, and why ideas come to us when we stop trying to force them, in a fantastic 1988 interview.

(Source: explore-blog)

theatlantic:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Last week, Africa Is a Country, a blog that documents and skewers Western misconceptions of Africa, ran a fascinating story about book design. It posted a collage of 36 covers of books that were either set in Africa or written by African writers. The texts of the books were as diverse as the geography they covered: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique. They were written in wildly divergent styles, by writers that included several Nobel Prize winners. Yet all of books’ covers featured an acacia tree, an orange sunset over the veld, or both.
"In short," the post said, "the covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Last week, Africa Is a Country, a blog that documents and skewers Western misconceptions of Africa, ran a fascinating story about book design. It posted a collage of 36 covers of books that were either set in Africa or written by African writers. The texts of the books were as diverse as the geography they covered: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique. They were written in wildly divergent styles, by writers that included several Nobel Prize winners. Yet all of books’ covers featured an acacia tree, an orange sunset over the veld, or both.

"In short," the post said, "the covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

brit:

Google Street View FTW. Read more.

brit:

Google Street View FTW. Read more.

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.
How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.
Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.
"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.
Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.

How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.

Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.

"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.

Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]